• This topic has 17 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 2 weeks ago by Aubry Bennett.
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    • #196163 Reply
      Jennifer Lawler
      Keymaster

      Say a few words about yourself and your goals for this class.

    • #196181 Reply
      Aubry Bennett
      Guest

      Hello! My name is Aubry and I specialize in copyediting and proofreading sewing patterns and instructions, academic work, and other nonfiction related to history or craft. I am also branching out into developmental editing and copyeditng/proofreading for fiction, specifically historical fiction, fantasy, and romance.

      My goal for 2021 is to grow my freelance business to include more than just indie authors, and in this class, I hope to get a better understanding of publisher expectations and the best way to approach them.

      I look forward to meeting and learning from you all over the coming weeks. 🙂

      • #196185 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Hi, Aubry! Welcome to the class. I think there is a lot of opportunity in the craft space, and I hope this class helps you pick up a few clients!

      • #196189 Reply
        Eugenia Lazaris Schluter
        Guest

        Hi Aubry,

        It’s nice to meet you!

        Jeanie

      • #196210 Reply
        Aubry Bennett
        Guest

        Nice to meet you too, Jeanie!

    • #196182 Reply
      Shelley Egan
      Guest

      Greetings! My name is Shelley, and I’m a copy editor, developmental editor, and proofreader. I worked as a Hansard editor from 2008 to 2015 and started my own business in 2016. My first job was editing a new magazine, but I didn’t enjoy it and decided to focus on editing fiction. So far, I’ve worked with indie authors and two small Canadian publishers. I also teach a workshop on fixing common writing errors through the continuing education department of a nearby university.

      My goal is to find out how to get work from fiction publishers, especially romance publishers. My sense is that many editors are out there looking, so it would be good to know how to make my application stand out.

      I’m looking forward to hearing what has worked well for others and to learning a lot in this course!

      • #196186 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Hi, Shelley! Welcome to the class. Yes, there is a lot of competition in this area, especially with regards to fiction (romance in particular) but the fact that you have previous publishing experience is always a help. I am looking forward to working out a plan with you!

      • #196188 Reply
        Eugenia Lazaris Schluter
        Guest

        Hi Shelly!

        It’s nice to meet you. Hansard editing sounds tough. How did you get into that?

        Jeanie

      • #196190 Reply
        Shelley Egan
        Guest

        Hi Jeanie,

        A friend saw an ad online and suggested that I apply. Strong language skills were required, and I had been teaching English to speakers of other languages. A good knowledge of current events was also asked for, and I’m a political junkie, so that helped. There was a spelling test, and I had to transcribe a two-minute recording. That was actually a lot of fun, and my grammar, punctuation, and spelling were scored.

        In terms of the work being tough, some others didn’t fare as well as I did because they lacked the grammar and punctuation skills. We were basically changing spoken English to written English and also had to be careful not to change the speakers’ intent.

        I hope that answers your question. If you have any others, don’t hesitate to ask!

        Shelley

      • #196193 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Shelley, that sounds hard, but what terrific training for CE! It is so important not to change intent when editing.

    • #196187 Reply
      Eugenia Lazaris Schluter
      Guest

      Hello from SoCal!
      My name is Eugenia (but please call me Jeanie) and I am in the process of changing fields from social work to editing. I have been in social work for longer than I can remember and when burnout hit I started exploring other options. I began writing about four years ago and have had my work published in travel magazines and online sites and along the way I discovered editing. Once I started the copyediting program at UCSD last winter, I was hooked. My experience as an editor is basically nill at this point but I hope that with time, perseverence, and learning as much as I can, I will be able to start editing fiction.
      Looking forward to learning with all of you!

      • #196194 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Hi, Jeanie! Welcome to the class. One of the things I like about freelance editing is that it is so flexible and it can scale up or down, depending on your situation/needs at the moment. I think having more control over your work decisions and how your career evolves makes a big difference in how stressful it feels. I mean, there’s always the challenge of getting clients, but you make all the decisions about how you go about it and if a client isn’t a good match for you, you don’t have to keep working with them. I love that–although of course it makes me basically unemployable for a staff job 🙂

    • #196191 Reply
      Kara Aisenbrey
      Guest

      Hello everyone!
      My name is Kara, and I specialize in fantasy and science fiction editing for YA, new adult, and adult. I love just about everything with a spark of the unusual in it–historical, contemporary, fairy tale, dystopian, space travel, steampunk…I love it all. I offer copyediting, line editing, and developmental editing, but I must say my first love is helping authors with the story elements most. But I am not opposed to taking on copyediting work from publishers, especially as sometimes it’s a nice change of pace from pondering developmental problems.

      I have only ever worked with indie authors directly. I do love being able to help authors on the road to self-publishing, so I will probably continue to work with indies, but I definitely would like the opportunity of some bread-and-butter publishing clients. My goal is to be able to quit my day job within the next year and be able to devote all my time to my freelance editing business. I would love to know whether I have the experience yet to be able to start targeting any publishers–and if not, what my next steps are to make that happen. And I would love some advice on which publishing types to target and how to approach them (I have never cold-emailed anyone before, and I admit that my toes start to curl up in dread at the thought of all the gaffes I could make).

      It’s nice to get to know you all, and I look forward to our discussions! 🙂
      Kara

      • #196195 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Hi, Kara! Welcome to the class. I love that you have such clear goals for your editing business. I agree that having a mix of clients is a good idea; it helps stabilize your business. For years I worked almost exclusively with publishers but when I started adding indie clients to the mix, I found I really enjoyed the interaction with authors (you get a lot less direct connection with authors when working for publishers). I still don’t have tons of indie clients but wouldn’t want to give up the ones I do have.

        I also think having a mix of editing types is helpful. CE and DE use different parts of the brain and it can be nice break to move from one to the author. I don’t do much CE anymore but I find that teaching is similar; it gives a break from DE all day. Hope you find the class useful!

    • #196197 Reply
      Mary Lanham
      Guest

      Hello, all! I’m Mary, and I primarily edit speculative fiction (sci fi, fantasy, and magic realism) and spiritual nonfiction. I do both developmental editing and copyediting, and am pretty equally happy with both of those roles. When it comes to proofreading, though, my brain starts to hurt. I really respect editors who can fully take off their DE and CE hats, but I haven’t learned that knack yet.

      This past year I landed my first few paying indie clients, and I really liked working directly with writers. But I’ve found that the marketing grind really drains my energy; this year I want to establish one or two publishing clients so I won’t be as reliant on marketing to individual authors. Of course, there will always be marketing involved with this kind of work! But I think diversifying will really help me get out of that scarcity mode, panic approach to that aspect of my business.

      I have an upcoming first gig with a book packager, doing some developmental outline editing for their YA fantasy ghostwriters. My goals for this class are to make sure I’m prepped to really rock my first assignments for this company, and to plan a strategy for pitching myself to some other publishers once I’ve got a few more edits under my belt.

      Nice to virtually meet all of you! I always like seeing the diversity of backgrounds and kinds of work in any group of editors.

      • #196198 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Mary, congrats on getting that first gig with a packager! It will be a big help in getting other work from other publishers. If you’re willing to share, I’m sure other students would love to hear how you landed that opportunity.

        I agree that having one or two publisher/packager clients helps reduce the amount of marketing you need to do. I think a mix of indie and publishing client work is ideal as it spreads the risk around.

      • #196199 Reply
        Mary Lanham
        Guest

        Happy to share! I’ll put some details over in the Getting Work thread.

      • #196204 Reply
        Jennifer Lawler
        Guest

        Thanks, Mary!

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