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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 180 total)
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  • in reply to: Hello! And transferable skills #117250
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Nancy, great point. In teaching lit we’re on the path of hermeneutics, or discovering meaning, whereas in editing we’re more on the path of poetics, that is, discovering the principles of how narrative works. But they are two sides of the same coin.

    I agree that having a lot of curiosity about the world is a huge help for editors! The random things that I know and which have proven to be useful in the course of my career is really staggering when I think about it.

    in reply to: Common abbreviations we use in talking about editing #117249
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    ARC is the ms at the galley stage, so (typically) after copyediting but before the final proofread. Thanks for the addition to the list!

    in reply to: Hello! And transferable skills #114744
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Mary, that’s so true–never underestimate the importance of background knowledge when editing! I have a wide range of interests and knowing a lot of random information about a lot of subjects has helped me do better work as an editor.

    in reply to: Hello! And transferable skills #113304
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    I’m glad to hear you’ve found Club Ed helpful! I’m glad to answer questions as you further explore editing as a career.

    in reply to: Hello! And transferable skills #112824
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Hi, Alex! Thanks for posting. I hope a few other people see this and respond. (The Club Ed forums are just getting started so we’re working on building some traction).

    I have often said that information architecture is basically developmental editing in another field. It’s about figuring out the most effective way to tell a story or inform the audience (whatever your intention happens to be). I would imagine the information design is very similar as well. And of course having a background as a writer also helps as it gives you a good sense of craft.

    A lot of the focus of Club Ed is on fiction, just because that happens to be what most of my students have been interested in, but nonfiction DE is actually easier to break into as there’s so much more of it being published. Having special subject matter knowledge also helps. For ex, publishers of art, art history, or museum related periodicals or books would be more likely to hire you because you have subject matter knowledge. If you’re interested in nonfiction DE, I will soon be adding an updated version of my NF class to the catalog (by June 1, fingers crossed).

    A lot of my students have come from other fields, particularly law (where the ability to make cogent arguments is a highly transferable skill) but also nursing and computer science. Over the years, I’ve realized a lot of people love language and words but don’t really see how to make a career out of it and so test other fields first. But there is so much that can be transferred: nurses are empathetic but still have to do what needs to be done (a great trait for a DE); computer people tend to be logical and problem-solving–again, excellent traits for a DE.

    in reply to: Query Letter Sample #110994
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Hi, Sarah–

    I have query letters available because I’ve written them over the years. If you don’t have one, here’s a great resource: https://www.janefriedman.com/query-letters/

    You can, in addition, make one up and show edits as a way to give the author an example of what you would do.

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110659
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Thank you!

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110657
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Okay, great! Let’s do a June 3 meeting and a July 1 meeting and I’ll figure out what the July 1 book will be soon. The June 3 book is Marlon James’s BLACK LEOPARD, RED WOLF and it’s supposed to be a very good SFF novel and I thought it would be nice to change things up a bit.

    Jake, since you are always here for book club (thank you) would you mind being the designated person to start the thread on June 3 without me? I’ll try to check in but as I said I may be on the road so don’t want to count on being able to do so. I’ll email you the July pick so you can post it then, too.

    Okay! Carry on!

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110638
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    LOL, Mary, these discussions always make me wonder if I like what I’ve read as well as I thought I did.

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110637
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    I have to get ready for a board meeting so I am going to wander off, but please do continue discussing without me if you have more to say.

    I am going to be moving in June and think I may be on the road June 3 when we would normally have the next meeting. If we skip next month, that would mean the next meeting would be July 1. This is not a problem for me but it may be for others because of the US holiday.

    Should we meet again in August? Or could someone take over for the June conversation so we don’t lose momentum? And how do we feel about a July meeting?

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110632
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Or maybe it’s just that omniscient narration is how movie people think? So they see the possibilities more easily?

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110631
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    It comes and goes. Twenty years ago omniscient narration was everywhere, then it pretty much vanished for a while, now it’s re-emerging. I don’t think it’s a problem per se when it’s done well–I mean, in this case, I didn’t feel like we were head-hopping, being jerked from character to character; it was handled pretty well. It’s just that it created such a sense of distance from the characters.

    I do think omniscient POV is much easier to adapt to screen then deep third or first.

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110626
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    I took a class on this long ago, and it was so fascinating to see different ways stories can be told from one medium to another. And a challenge is that people think they can adapt methods of one medium to another but this doesn’t work so well. A novel is not a movie is not a comic book is not a stage play.

    I was about to insert a comment about LOTR but decided that would derail the discussion.

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110611
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    The time period, like the characters’ ages, felt inconsistent to me as well. I felt like it was a good thing the author told us it took place in 1997 because otherwise I would never have known.

    in reply to: Little Fires Everywhere discussion #110607
    Jennifer Lawler
    Keymaster

    Oh, I see, Jacque! Yes, great point.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 180 total)